Teen Kidnapped And Paralyzed By Evil Boyfriend FINALLY Able To Give Mom A Miracle Hug



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Each day her arm reached around her quiet daughter, her hand firmly behind her back long enough to squeeze every ounce of love she could into the motionless body.

For 18 months, Nikki Lynn could only grab hold of her once-vibrant, blond-haired Angel, hoping that the depth of her emotion would stir something locked up deep inside. Nothing to worry about.

Then, about two weeks ago, Nikki first felt Angel’s right arm reach around her back; her hand presses gently on her back and then moves to stroke her hair.

She can only nod when I ask if it felt like a miracle. She didn’t believe her daughter would ever hug her again.

“She just put her hand right around my back and started tapping me,” 47-year-old Nikki recalls, exhausted and barely believing.

“She didn’t hug much, she was a typical teenager, but she would give you a hug if you were upset. It’s very special to have that hug now.”

Angel Lynn was just 19 when her abusive boyfriend Chay Bowskill, 21, kidnapped her as she walked near her home in Loughborough in September 2020, grabbed her in a bear-like grip, forced her into a van and then drove off with his boyfriend, Rocco Sansoom.







Angel with a TV remote

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Chay Bowskill was convicted of kidnapping, coercion, controlling behavior and disrupting the course of justice

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Angel fell on the road at a speed of 100 km/h on the A6. Bowskill has stated that he is not sure if she fell or jumped. Angel was unable to give her an account.

Her brain injury was so severe that her parents, Nikki and Paddy, 54, were warned multiple times that she was going to die. Since then she can no longer talk, eat or walk. For months she barely reacted to anything, a condition so devastating that Nikki admits she wondered if she would have been better off in peace.

In January, Bowskill was sentenced to seven and a half years in prison after being found guilty of kidnapping, checking and coercion and perverting the course of justice, but the Lynns were outraged, and two weeks ago at the Court of Appeals, the sentence was increased up to 12 years.

Sansome was sentenced to 21 months in prison for his part in the kidnapping, which he denied.

It was around that acutely stressful time, Angel began to make incredible breakthroughs.

The family first reveals them, saying that she not only hugged her mother but smiled, tried to kiss, wave, hold the TV remote and write words in response to questions, all of them with her right hand – her left side is more severely affected.

Incredibly, she also started making noises and impressed doctors who referred her for specialist speech therapy. The family now hopes that Angel can one day reveal what happened to her.







Angel was kidnapped by her abusive boyfriend

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Leicestershire Police / SWNS)

“A doctor called me once and said, ‘Nikki, you’ll have to accept that Angel isn’t going to make it,'” recalls the mother, who runs a cleaning company with her husband.

His exact words were ‘miracles happen, but in Angel’s case there will be no miracle’.

“But a miracle has happened. That hug was a miracle. She always looked right through you, there was nothing in her eyes at all. She can now smile spontaneously.

“When she started making the noises, we gave her a pen and paper and said, ‘Are you okay? Are you hurt?’ And she wrote ‘No’.

“Her brother recently asked her what she wanted and she wrote ‘Chocolate’.

“She can give you a thumbs up for yes. She can now press her nurse’s button to arouse them, she understands that humor. She had a cheeky sense of humor.

“Little by little, I feel like we’re starting to get her back.”

Next to her, Paddy talks little, but when he does, his overwhelming emotion is apparent.







Angel before being attacked

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Leicestershire Police / SWNS)







She suffered a serious brain injury

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“She gave me a kiss,” he confides. “She puts her hand over her mouth and holds it there for at least a minute, then tries to blow. She’ll try. It means a lot.”

Asking Angel what happened 18 months ago is something for “down the line,” they say. Her progress is still slow.

“We don’t want to bomb her, her mental health may not be able to handle that,” explains Nikki.

This avalanche of minor milestones coincided with the discontinuation of one drug, Baclofen, an antispasmodic.

They hope that a further reduction in seizure medication will allow her to try eating again. She is currently being fed to her stomach through a tube.

Today, 21-year-old Angel lives in a 24-hour care home, although she can make home visits of up to four hours in a wheelchair. She is still at high risk for pneumonia and cannot lie flat.

The family provides bed linen and towels so that the smell reminds her of home; they make sure she has trusted toiletries, Ted Baker body lotion, Angel perfume. They do her nails and hair.

They would very much like her back home, but need an extension for specialist facilities and a carer, and are raising money for long-term care.

She is barely recognizable as the young girl she was. Stunning, stubborn, a teenager who liked manicures and went shopping with her mother, who adored her little sister and brother, Kelsie, ten, and Jimmy, nine, who has severe autism.







Nikki was heartbroken after her daughter was paralyzed

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Jason Senior)

She studied public services at university and had considered working in forensic science.

But she withdrew when she got together with Bowskill, a criminal who has now been added to his prison sentence for two years for conspiracy to commit burglary, as part of a gang that stole prestigious cars.

During the lockdowns, she mainly lived with him. Nikki admits she was unaware that the one-year relationship was abusive and was shocked by Bowskill’s catalog of derogatory, bullying messages to Angel revealed in court.

Once she recalls Angel coming home and asking her to pick up the phone when it rang, explaining that Bowskill wouldn’t call her cell because he wanted to know she was home.

“I said he was paranoid, but I had no idea,” admits Nikki. “If I had any idea, I would have ended that relationship.”

She only wished she had known the signs of control and coercion.

After the accident on September 17, Angel was airlifted to hospital and underwent emergency surgery for a brain hemorrhage.

Debilitating attacks followed. Later she contracted Covid-19 and almost died again.

“They let us sleep with her all week because they said she wouldn’t make it,” Nikki says.

Nikki is now on antidepressants and has trouble sleeping. Little Jimmy is nervous about his sister’s changed appearance and Kelsie gets support. She is “angry all the time”.

Nikki says: “She loves Angel, she will brush her hair, apply cream, take her oxygen levels. She’s not 11 yet, she’s a bit of a caregiver.”

The road ahead is long for this whole family.

However, hope grows with the hugs and kisses. Nikki dares to envision a future.

“She’s locked up, but every time I see her I tell her ‘Don’t give up, keep trying, keep telling yourself you can do it,'” she says.

Visit this website to raise money for Angel’s rehabilitation.

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